Overview

The Associate in Arts Degree (A.A.) with a concentration in Forensic Psychology is a great path for students who want to work toward becoming a forensic psychologist, where they will apply their knowledge of psychological science, assessment, methods, and research to the legal system.

The Forensic Psychology concentration is designed to incorporate a foundation of biological, psychological, and social science with an understanding of the criminal justice system. Forensic psychologists apply scientific and technical knowledge to the law and legal issues. This program trains graduates to use psychological science in forensic evaluation and provide expertise and guidance to judicial systems, social and public safety organizations, and the military.

How to Enroll

To pursue this degree, you must apply to MTC using our online application.

Apply Now

Application Process
Financial Aid & Scholarships

Print Plan

Sample Program Plan and Costs

Semester Course ID Course Title Classroom Online Hybrid Credits
Semester 1
(15 Credit Hours)
COL-105 Freshman Seminar

Freshman Seminar

ID: COL-105

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the purposes of higher education and provides a general orientation to the functions and resources of the college. The course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the college community, develop a better understanding of the learning process, and acquire essential academic survival skills.

3
PSY-201 General Psychology

General Psychology

ID: PSY-201

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes the following topics and concepts in the science of behavior: scientific method, biological bases for behavior, perception, motivation, learning memory, development, personality, abnormal behavior, therapeutic techniques, and social psychology.

3
MAT-120 Probability and Statistics

Probability and Statistics

ID: MAT-120

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes the following topics: introductory probability and statistics, including organization of data, sample space concepts, random variables, counting problems, binomial and normal distributions, central limit theorem, confidence intervals,and test hypothesis for large and small samples; types I and II errors; linear regression; and correlation. (Graphic calculator required)

3
ENG-101 English Comp I

English Comp I

ID: ENG-101

Credit Hours: 3

This is a (college transfer) course in which the following topics are presented: a study of composition in conjunction with appropriate literary selections, with frequent theme assignments to reinforce effective writing. A review of standard usage and the basic techniques of research are also presented.

3
MUS-105 Music Appreciation

Music Appreciation

ID: MUS-105

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the study of music with focus on the elements of music and their relationships, the musical characteristics of representative works and composers, common musical forms and genres of various western and non-western historical style periods, and appropriate listening experiences.

3
Semester 2
(16 Credit Hours)
ENG-102 English Comp II

English Comp II

ID: ENG-102

Credit Hours: 3

This is a (college transfer) course in which the following topics are presented: development of writing skills through logical organization, effective style, literary analysis and research. An introduction to literary genre is also included.

3
CRJ-101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Introduction to Criminal Justice

ID: CRJ-101

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes an overview of the functions and responsibilities of agencies involved in the administration of justice to include police organizations, court systems, correctional systems, and juvenile justice agencies.

3
PSY-203 Human Growth and Development

Human Growth and Development

ID: PSY-203

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the physical, cognitive, and social factors affecting human growth, development, and potential.

3
BIO-101 Biological Science I

Biological Science I

ID: BIO-101

Credit Hours: 4

This course is a study of the scientific method, basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cell physiology, cell reproduction and development, mendelian genetics, population genetics, natural selection, evolution, and ecology.

4
SOC-205 Social Problems

Social Problems

ID: SOC-205

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a survey of current social problems in america, stressing the importance of social change and conflicts as they influence perceptions, definitions, etiology, and possible solutions.

3
Semester 3
(15 Credit Hours)
PHI-115 Contemporary Moral Issues

Contemporary Moral Issues

ID: PHI-115

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines moral issues in contemporary society, including basic principles and applications of ethics.

3
HIS-102 Western Civilization Post 1689

Western Civilization Post 1689

ID: HIS-102

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a survey of western civilization from 1689 to the present, including major political, social, economic, and intellectual factors which shape the modern western world.

3
CRJ-125 Criminology

Criminology

ID: CRJ-125

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the various theories of criminal causation and control, the identification of criminal typologies, and the reaction of society to crime and criminals.

3
PSY-212 Abnormal Psychology

Abnormal Psychology

ID: PSY-212

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the nature and development of behavioral disorders, including the investigation of contemporary treatment procedures. In depth review of the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders; the psychological, biological and sociocultural perspectives on these disorders; and the efficacy of various treatment approaches is included.

3
SPC-205 Public Speaking

Public Speaking

ID: SPC-205

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to principles of public speaking with application of speaking skills. Students entering this course must be able to communicate clearly with American speakers of English.

3
Semester 4
(15 Credit Hours)
CRJ-115 Criminal Law I

Criminal Law I

ID: CRJ-115

Credit Hours: 3

This course covers the development of criminal law in America. The basic elements of specific criminal offenses, criminal defenses, and various legal principles upon which criminal law is established are reviewed.

3
PSC-201 American Government

American Government

ID: PSC-201

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of national governmental institutions with emphasis on the constitution, the functions of executive, legislative and judicial branches, civil liberties and the role of the electorate. The impact of current events on the national government and institutions is emphasized.

3
CRJ-220 The Judicial Process

The Judicial Process

ID: CRJ-220

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes an overview of the law-making function of the courts, the growth of common law, the structure and organization of the courts, court processes and procedures involved in criminal and civil cases, and the question of reform for the administration of justice.

3
PSY-225 Social Psychology

Social Psychology

ID: PSY-225

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of individual behavior as influenced by social roles, group identification, attitudes, and values.

3
REL-102 Introduction to Biblical Studies

Introduction to Biblical Studies

ID: REL-102

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the contemporary analysis of the bible, including its historical background, writing and transmission, its principal persons and events, and its ideas and their significance for the present.

3
      Total Credit Hours 61
      Estimated Cost
Financial Aid
$11,468.00
Not including fees and equipment
Semester Course ID Course Title Classroom Online Hybrid Credits
Semester 1
(6 Credit Hours)
COL-105 Freshman Seminar

Freshman Seminar

ID: COL-105

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the purposes of higher education and provides a general orientation to the functions and resources of the college. The course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the college community, develop a better understanding of the learning process, and acquire essential academic survival skills.

3
PSY-201 General Psychology

General Psychology

ID: PSY-201

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes the following topics and concepts in the science of behavior: scientific method, biological bases for behavior, perception, motivation, learning memory, development, personality, abnormal behavior, therapeutic techniques, and social psychology.

3
Semester 2
(9 Credit Hours)
MAT-120 Probability and Statistics

Probability and Statistics

ID: MAT-120

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes the following topics: introductory probability and statistics, including organization of data, sample space concepts, random variables, counting problems, binomial and normal distributions, central limit theorem, confidence intervals,and test hypothesis for large and small samples; types I and II errors; linear regression; and correlation. (Graphic calculator required)

3
ENG-101 English Comp I

English Comp I

ID: ENG-101

Credit Hours: 3

This is a (college transfer) course in which the following topics are presented: a study of composition in conjunction with appropriate literary selections, with frequent theme assignments to reinforce effective writing. A review of standard usage and the basic techniques of research are also presented.

3
MUS-105 Music Appreciation

Music Appreciation

ID: MUS-105

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the study of music with focus on the elements of music and their relationships, the musical characteristics of representative works and composers, common musical forms and genres of various western and non-western historical style periods, and appropriate listening experiences.

3
Semester 3
(6 Credit Hours)
ENG-102 English Comp II

English Comp II

ID: ENG-102

Credit Hours: 3

This is a (college transfer) course in which the following topics are presented: development of writing skills through logical organization, effective style, literary analysis and research. An introduction to literary genre is also included.

3
CRJ-101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Introduction to Criminal Justice

ID: CRJ-101

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes an overview of the functions and responsibilities of agencies involved in the administration of justice to include police organizations, court systems, correctional systems, and juvenile justice agencies.

3
Semester 4
(10 Credit Hours)
PSY-203 Human Growth and Development

Human Growth and Development

ID: PSY-203

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the physical, cognitive, and social factors affecting human growth, development, and potential.

3
BIO-101 Biological Science I

Biological Science I

ID: BIO-101

Credit Hours: 4

This course is a study of the scientific method, basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cell physiology, cell reproduction and development, mendelian genetics, population genetics, natural selection, evolution, and ecology.

4
SOC-205 Social Problems

Social Problems

ID: SOC-205

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a survey of current social problems in america, stressing the importance of social change and conflicts as they influence perceptions, definitions, etiology, and possible solutions.

3
Semester 5
(9 Credit Hours)
PHI-115 Contemporary Moral Issues

Contemporary Moral Issues

ID: PHI-115

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines moral issues in contemporary society, including basic principles and applications of ethics.

3
HIS-102 Western Civilization Post 1689

Western Civilization Post 1689

ID: HIS-102

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a survey of western civilization from 1689 to the present, including major political, social, economic, and intellectual factors which shape the modern western world.

3
CRJ-125 Criminology

Criminology

ID: CRJ-125

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the various theories of criminal causation and control, the identification of criminal typologies, and the reaction of society to crime and criminals.

3
Semester 6
(6 Credit Hours)
PSY-212 Abnormal Psychology

Abnormal Psychology

ID: PSY-212

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of the nature and development of behavioral disorders, including the investigation of contemporary treatment procedures. In depth review of the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders; the psychological, biological and sociocultural perspectives on these disorders; and the efficacy of various treatment approaches is included.

3
SPC-205 Public Speaking

Public Speaking

ID: SPC-205

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to principles of public speaking with application of speaking skills. Students entering this course must be able to communicate clearly with American speakers of English.

3
Semester 7
(6 Credit Hours)
CRJ-115 Criminal Law I

Criminal Law I

ID: CRJ-115

Credit Hours: 3

This course covers the development of criminal law in America. The basic elements of specific criminal offenses, criminal defenses, and various legal principles upon which criminal law is established are reviewed.

3
PSC-201 American Government

American Government

ID: PSC-201

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of national governmental institutions with emphasis on the constitution, the functions of executive, legislative and judicial branches, civil liberties and the role of the electorate. The impact of current events on the national government and institutions is emphasized.

3
Semester 8
(9 Credit Hours)
CRJ-220 The Judicial Process

The Judicial Process

ID: CRJ-220

Credit Hours: 3

This course includes an overview of the law-making function of the courts, the growth of common law, the structure and organization of the courts, court processes and procedures involved in criminal and civil cases, and the question of reform for the administration of justice.

3
PSY-225 Social Psychology

Social Psychology

ID: PSY-225

Credit Hours: 3

This course is a study of individual behavior as influenced by social roles, group identification, attitudes, and values.

3
REL-102 Introduction to Biblical Studies

Introduction to Biblical Studies

ID: REL-102

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the contemporary analysis of the bible, including its historical background, writing and transmission, its principal persons and events, and its ideas and their significance for the present.

3
      Total Credit Hours 61
      Estimated Cost
Financial Aid
$11,468.00
Not including fees and equipment

Careers

Forensic Psychologist

A Forensic Psychologist uses their expertise in psychological science, assessment, evaluation, and research to analyze and provide guidance on legal issues. They work in the judicial system, government, prisons, psychiatric facilities, private practice, and the military sector. They may conduct forensic evaluations, testify in court, work with veterans or defendants, or in threat assessment.

Projected Job Growth

+31.1%

Average Annual Salary

$89,538

According to EMSI data as of 2018

Where Can I Work?

  • Mental Health Facilities
  • Government Agencies
  • Law Enforcement

Careers

Victim Advocate

A Victim Advocate uses his or her expertise in psychology and understanding of the criminal justice system to work closely with victims of crimes. They assist victims by educating them about their legal rights, by helping them navigate the legal system and handling the complexities of reporting paperwork. They may provide support by being present during questioning by law enforcement and by attending court with the victim.

Projected Job Growth

+5.5%

Average Annual Salary

$44,277

According to EMSI data as of 2018

Where Can I Work?

  • Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services
  • Government Agencies
  • Non-Profit Organizations

What’s next after I complete this program?

Earn a Bachelor’s Degree

Graduates who wish to expand their employment options and earnings potential can continue their education at a four-year school by earning their Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Psychology. Those who have earned their B.A. or B.S. in Psychology will find themselves eligible to apply for a broader range of positions and earn higher compensation. Some will find work in an occupation related to psychology, but many also find that their psychology degree prepares them for other professions in areas like education, public affairs, business, and service industries.

Earn a Master’s Degree, Ph.D., or Psy.D

Graduates with a bachelor’s degree can pursue a master’s degree or Ph.D. in psychology. A graduate degree in areas like forensic, counseling, school, clinical, industrial/organizational, or developmental psychology can expand the range of career opportunities in forensics, counseling, research, data analysis, government, education, consulting, marketing, and organizational development. A doctoral degree, or Ph.D., offers the opportunity for independent practice or research as a psychologist in various areas of specialization.