Paralegal

Business and Public Service Careers

About the Career

A paralegal is a skilled professional who assists attorneys in preparing their cases. Paralegals investigate the facts of cases and ensure that all relevant information is considered. They also identify appropriate laws, judicial decisions, legal articles and other materials that are relevant to assigned cases. After they analyze and organize the information, paralegals may prepare written reports that attorneys use in determining how cases should be handled. Should attorneys decide to file lawsuits on behalf of clients, paralegals may help prepare the legal arguments, draft pleadings and motions to be filed with the court, obtain affidavits, and assist attorneys during trials. Paralegals also organize and track files of important case documents and make them available and easily accessible to attorneys. While paralegals continue to assume a growing range of tasks in the nation’s legal offices and perform many of the same tasks as lawyers, they are still explicitly prohibited from carrying out duties which are considered to be the practice of law, such as setting legal fees, giving legal advice and presenting cases in court. The duties of paralegals vary widely based on the type of organization in which they are employed. Employment opportunities include law firms, insurance companies, real estate offices, mortgage companies, government agencies, courts and banks. Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law. This program is approved by the American Bar Association.


Academic Programs

Paralegal

The Paralegal program prepares students to assist lawyers in carrying out their professional responsibilities.

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Paralegal

The Paralegal program prepares students to assist lawyers in carrying out their professional responsibilities.

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Projected Job Growth

none*

* Source: EMSI Career Coach

Average Annual Salary

$42,685*

* Source: EMSI Career Coach

Academics

Academic students are taking courses for credit toward a degree, certificate, or diploma. They can earn a degree, certificate, or diploma at MTC or transfer to another school to complete their studies. Academic students must apply to and enroll at the college.

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Training

Training students—sometimes called "Continuing Education" students—can take individual courses or earn certificates and certifications. They don't have to apply to the college; they can register directly for classes. Training courses don't earn college credit or transfer to other institutions.

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