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HOW IS COLLEGE DIFFERENT FROM HIGH SCHOOL?

GRADES IN HIGH SCHOOL
GRADES IN COLLEGE
  • Grades are given for most assigned work.
  • Grades may not be provided for all assigned work.
  • Consistently good homework grades may help raise your overall grade when test grades are low.
  • Grades on tests and major papers usually provide most of the course grade.
  • Extra credit projects are often available to help you raise your grade.
  • Extra credit projects cannot, are often not available. If they are, they usually will not significantly alter a student's grade.
  • Initial test grades, especially when they are low, may not have an adverse effect on your final grade.
  • Watch out for your first tests. These are usually "wake-up calls" to let you know what is expected-but they also may account for a substantial part of your course grade. You may be shocked when you get your grades. If you receive notice of low grades on a Mid-Semester Progress Report, see your academic advisor or visit the Academic Success Center.
  • You may graduate as long as you have passed all required courses with a grade of D or higher.
  • You may graduate only if your average in classes meets the departmental standard-typically, a 2.0 or "C" average, but not always.
  • Guiding principle: "Effort counts." Courses are usually structured to reward a "good-faith effort."
  • Guiding principle: "Results count." Though "good-faith effort" is important in regard to the professor's willingness to help you achieve good results, it will not substitute for results in the grading process.
Source: http://smu.edu/alec/transition.asp

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